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Call for Submissions: baldhip magazine

Lambda Literary - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 10:39pm

Canada-based baldhip magazine is looking for submissions for its next online issue.

baldhip is committed to publishing 50% lady-identified folks. We publish poetry and visual art–but anything we can host online is a possibility. We love work which is cross-genre or interacts with new media, but we also love traditional forms with non-traditional content. baldhip is Canadian but this is the Internet.

Any queries re: submissions can be directed to the editors @baldhipmag on twitter or via email at baldhipmag@gmail.com.

baldhipmagazine.ca
@baldhipmag on twitter
baldhipmag.tumblr.com

Deadline for issue 3 is December 15th.

Categories: Book News, LGBTQ

In Conversation: Christopher Gaskins and Robert Siek

Lambda Literary - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 10:03pm

In celebration of the one-year anniversary of the release of each of their first books of poetry, Boys Have Been… and Purpose and Devil Piss, poets Christopher Gaskins and Robert Siek have a discussion about their collections, focusing on the themes and styles in their work.

A native Floridian, Christopher Gaskins moved to New York City in 1999 looking for the hustle and bustle he’d always heard so much about, but he eventually came to his senses and returned home in the summer of 2012. He currently lives in Orlando, where he teaches high school English. His poems have appeared in such journals as The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide, Ganymede, Open Minds Quarterly, Darkling, Pearl, Chroma, and in the anthologies Sanctified and Gay City, vol. 2. His first full-length collection of poetry is Boys Have Been… (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2013).

Robert Siek lives in Brooklyn and works at a large publishing house in Manhattan. He is the author of the poetry collection Purpose and Devil Piss (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2013) and the chapbook Clubbed Kid (New School University, 2002). His poetry has most recently appeared in The Good Men Project, Painted Bride Quarterly, The Gay and Lesbian Review Worldwide, and VACZINE, as well as the anthology Between: New Gay Poetry. Sometimes he blogs at hideandsiek.blogspot.com.

Christopher Gaskins: I noticed a theme/motif in your poems of “danger” and “death” (implied or actual). Here are some examples in the first few poems: the kindergarten teacher being killed in The Brood that you and your father are watching in the movie theater, and when you’re sitting alone in the van “Dad told me / to keep the doors locked” implies danger (“1979”); the junkie willing to do anything to score more heroin, with an overdose likely at some point (“Dreaming It”); there’s also a language of death with phrases like “poltergeist parade” and “killing my brains cells” (“Plastic Bags and Coated Leashes”); the fear of death and the possible danger of your father being ill like “his heart attack seven weeks ago” (“Like Clockwork”); there are implications of death with references to suicidal poets “Ms. Sexton, Sylvia” and the poem “Daddy” deals with Plath’s father’s death and wishing she could have murdered him (“Fresh Air”). And it goes on from there. My questions to you are, is this intentional or not, and what meanings does this theme/motif of “death” and “danger” have in the larger context of your book/poems?

Robert Siek

Robert Siek

Robert Siek: All of the poems you listed as examples of the “death/danger” theme/motif were written months to years apart, so there was never a plan on a whole-scale basis to incorporate those themes, at least not on a conscious level. I’m kind of weirded out by this surfacing. It makes me wonder where it comes from. I guess I’ve always been a bit obsessed with death, having read existentialist authors in middle school and then deciding I was an atheist at twelve or thirteen years old. (Since nineteen, I’ve been more agnostic.) And then I also toyed with death through my own drug usage through my teens to my mid-twenties, and I found going home with strangers for sex to be exciting because of the possibility of danger. I know I never wanted anything horrible to happen but I guess that’s where the excitement came in, sort of like my own little horror movie. This stuff is just more intense and comes across with more punch.

Gaskins: I also notice a lot of references to films and music, with many film and song titles showing up in the poems. What meaning is there in this? What do these film and song titles represent, or what larger purpose (if any) do they serve?

Siek: Growing up, my father took me to see many, many movies—mostly horror, sci-fi—and I think he unintentionally trained me to not fear horror movies and to find some sick joy in them. I suppose pop references are just there for the taking. If I’m affected in any way by a movie, it can make an appearance or completely encompass a poem. And I’m a rabid John Waters fan, so bits of his films occasionally show up. As for music, my discovery of New Wave in eighth grade saved me; it gave me somewhere else to focus my energies besides my loneliness and despair. My love for music and the persona I took on, the dressed-in-all-black goth kid, caused peers to call me “freak” more often than “fag” and caused me to see seedier sides of New York City. My love for music stuck with me. There really is no larger purpose to using movies and songs in my poems, other than their importance in my world and the head space they fill.

GaskinsAnother theme I noticed in your book was the idea of real vs. artificial. Again, is this intentional, and what meanings does it have in the larger context of your poems?

Siek: That was also not intentional. I suppose years of hiding my true self from family found its way into my work. Despite peers calling me fag since a young age, I still fought sexual feelings toward guys during adolescence. You’d think I would have accepted it and said, “Yes, you’re right. I like cock”; it was so frowned upon and made fun of in society, on TV, at family gatherings, that I had no interest in being one of those people that were so taboo and evil. So I got good grades, drew pictures, and roller-skated around town. I finally came out to myself and friends during my first year of college. Then I began going to nightclubs more often and dressing in insane outfits. I lived part-time in an alternate reality—drugs and sex everywhere and a strange hierarchy of freaks down to the visiting club goers out for fun. I think living like that distorted my perception of the world, but I honestly feel so far removed from that at this point in my life, I’m kind of shocked to see that it still exists in my work. There are also defense mechanisms and a hatred toward people created at a young age. I’ve mostly gotten over those, but occasionally still struggle. That probably comes through as real vs. artificial, like what I perceive as bad behavior displayed by another is really minimal to most people. It comes down to human behavior. We’re all self-conscious to a degree, and that in itself creates a constant of real vs. artificial in everyday life. I obsess over human behavior in my work.

GaskinsI also obsess over human behavior, both in real life and in my poems, although for me it’s more in terms of how it relates to myself, either directly or indirectly. I compare how I am with how others are, am always reevaluating myself as a person, constantly trying to evolve into a better version of who I am. I think this process of self-discovery and self-improvement is apparent in my poems, especially considering that the poems in Boys Have Been… are more or less arranged in chronological order, I tell them as they happened.

Siek: Let’s talk more about your book. I viewed the experience described in “Stephen’s Body” as something life changing—the discovery of something new, awakening to one’s sexuality. For me, the last three lines set the rest of the book in motion. Do you agree? Is that why you made it the first poem in the book?

Gaskins: Yes, that is what the poem is about and that is why I chose to begin the book with this poem. It is meant to set the rest of the collection in motion. It establishes a “coming out” awareness in the form of a physical/sexual encounter that also establishes a “purpose” in the speaker’s mind, a goal that he is on the voyage to reach, which he does at the end.

SiekI noticed that fire/volcanic imagery first appear in “Sexed,” but do not return until later in the book. I know you use lava, scalding, and other burning imagery in a fair amount of the poems. There is “lava hot chocolate inside of my igloo-hard hermetic heart” in “Cold,” which I read as a mixture of lust and a desire that it leads to love, the voice of the poem declaring, “my love a coal and two hands groping the bare ice walls.” In “Hot Ass,” the whole last third includes coal and fire imagery, the pair of men igniting into flames. What can you say about this?

Christopher Gaskins

Christopher Gaskins

GaskinsThe opposition of cold vs. hot, of ice vs. fire, in all its variations is intentional. For me, in the voyage of self-discovery/acceptance that my collection is (albeit in terms of a speaker who is navigating through a mosaic of male-to-male experiences), there is the battle between cold and hot. The speaker knows he is nervous, self-conscious, scared, holding back in fear of getting hurt, wanting to let others in but not necessarily knowing how; he often keeps others at bay even in intimate situations. There is the constant search for the flame that will melt all the ice once and forever, but even as the speaker encounters various forms of “fire” there is always another layer of “cold” and the battle continues until the end of the book, as seen in the last series “For Steve,” in particular the poem “In Bed, At Last.” It’s also a full circle because Boys Have Been… starts out with a poem about falling in love (and losing it) and then ends with a poem about being in love (and keeping it). The ending of the book is not about conforming to society or finding Mr. Right, but about landing safely on the shore after traveling through the waters of gay relationships (of every kind), or maybe even surviving the waters of gay love/lust. This opposition and battle of cold vs. hot as a theme appears in many of my poems, even as the subject of the poem itself.

Siek: The poem “Sunday Night Out in the East Village” is a favorite of mine, definitely for the manner in which it was written and the incredible imagery, such as the “arms like waves that crashed in silence” and “We were breathing humidity, / this steam we created… we looked around us and it fogged our vision.” And the last four lines just bring the entire thing to a dark, fiery, and subtle explosion. I thought, yes, that’s how it goes in those places, in the gay underground sex world. I love the complete abandon in this piece: the want of sex—period—the going to get it, becoming one with waves of other men, their hairline trails leading “toward Mt. Vesuvius,” and admitting to being “erect, about to erupt and scald the mouth of this man who has come here to engulf the flames.” Again, lava, fire, and a volcano. In this case, I believe the lava is pure lust, as it fuels “each sudden impulsive fellatio.”

GaskinsYes, the lava is pure lust as well as representing an orgasm.

Siek: And the “Mt. Vesuvius” is obviously a collective cock, as you also mention how the voice of the poem is about to erupt and “scald the mouth” of another man. I’ve noticed at this point that you repeat the image of the hairline that extends on many men from the navel to the pubic hair. There are other instances in your poems that you use that image as a directional. There is “slithering” happening: this time the sweat running down backs “like elongating tongues.” Is the repetition of images through many of the poems in the book on purpose?

Gaskins: Ok, you caught me red-handed! I must confess that the repeating image of a man’s “happy trail” is intentional, and very much so. On one hand, it’s one of my favorite places on a man’s body and the image is always with me in my imagination; it’s definitely a turn-on. On the other hand, it’s usage is figurative in that this “happy trail” is a path that hopefully leads to sexual gratification first, and then leads to emotional gratification; in other words, like that old saying of how falling into bed leads to falling into love. Also, the “happy trail” is very seductive, hinting at something exciting that is hidden and unknown, especially in someone I’ve just met or someone I don’t know. It points the direction in which treasure is buried beneath clothing. The “slithering” imagery is unintentional, however, but I do like the onomatopoeia of the word “slither” and it fits so well with many of the ideas or feelings I’m trying to convey in my poems.

SiekWhy did you choose to end the collection with “How Obvious, Then”?

Gaskins: Again, my collection is a story arc of sorts. It’s a speaker’s journey through the world of male-to-male experiences. Like most of us, he is searching for love and every kind of peace and happiness that comes with finding it. While figuratively at a starting line at the age of “twenty-two,” he falls “in love” and from there self-navigates through a variety of situations and interacts with the many types of characters that people the gay world, eventually arriving at his destination, where love may be a “reworded truth” but is still mutually acknowledged “in these early morning hours.” He’s learned a lot about himself and who he is, as well as what the gay world has to offer, both good and bad, and appreciates landing safely in the harbor.

 

 

Categories: Book News, LGBTQ

Book Review: 'Belzhar' By Meg Wolitzer

NPR Books - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 4:38pm

Novelist Gabrielle Zelvin reviews Meg Wolitzer's new young adult book, Belzhar.

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Categories: Book News

A Candid Memoir From Comedian Amy Poehler? 'Yes Please'

NPR Books - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 2:16pm

Poehler joins Fresh Air's Terry Gross to talk about fighting the body image "demon," being a "world-class snooper" and how she was once told that she had a "great face for wigs."

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Categories: Book News

Book News: 2 Popular Books May Be Coming To TV

NPR Books - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 10:25am

Ann Leckie's sci-fi epic Ancillary Justice and Karen Russell's St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves have been optioned for TV. Meanwhile, a long-lost Malcolm Lowry novel sees publication.

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Categories: Book News

'Slow Regard' Is A Riddle, Wrapped In A Mystery, Living In An Underground Tunnel

NPR Books - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 7:03am

Patrick Rothfuss' new novella is a dreamy flight of fantasy that follows a secondary character in his vast Kingkiller Chronicle: Auri, a quiet young woman living in a sprawling, secret tunnel network.

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Categories: Book News

The Battle For Dreamland, Revisited In 'Nemo'

NPR Books - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 7:03am

A lavishly produced new tribute to Winsor McCay's Little Nemo comics gathers dozens of today's artists to revisit Slumberland. Critic Etelka Lehoczky says the book is beautiful but unchallenging.

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Categories: Book News

Please Support Lambda Literary’s Fall Challenge! Your Gift Matched Dollar-for-Dollar During Campaign!

Lambda Literary - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 11:17pm

Lambda Literary believes lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer literature is fundamental to the preservation of our culture, and that LGBTQ lives are affirmed when our stories are written, published and read. In the spirit of this mission, we ask you to consider supporting our work today on behalf of established and emerging writers, readers, librarians, independent and mainstream publishers, editors, bloggers, and others interested in great books that tell the LGBTQ experience.

We have six extraordinary members of Lambda Literary – Steven Coulter, Charles Forester, Sandra Nathan, Katherine Percy, John Rochester and Curtis Scribner - who have pledged a total of $17,500 toward our goal of $35,000 but only if we can raise the rest of our goal.

Through the month of November, your donations will be matched dollar-for-dollar to help raise much needed funds for Lambda Literary’s exceptional, one-of-a-kind programming:

  • The Lambda Literary Awards, since 1989, are the most prestigious LGBTQ literary prize in the world. This year’s ceremony honored Alison Bechdel with the Trustee Award for Excellence in Literature and Kate Bornstein with the Pioneer Award, as well as Lammy winners in 24 different genres.
  • The Lambda Literary Review web magazine publishes more LGBTQ book reviews than any other publication and features extensive literary resources and in-depth author interviews with writers such as Sarah WatersSaeed Jones,Jonathan LethemJohn WatersMichael Cunningham and Emma Donoghue, to name a few from this year alone.
  • The Writers Retreat for Emerging LGBTQ Voices is a one-week residency, which offers intensive and sophisticated instruction to selected LGBTQ writers. The Retreat provides open access to industry professionals and the opportunity for writing fellows to create an ongoing community of practice as they advance in their craft and careers.
  • LGBTQ Writers in Schools invites LGBTQ authors into classrooms to discuss our community’s literature with young people. This fall, the San Diego Unified School District officially adopted Lambda’s WIS Program into their high school curriculum!

If you are not a current supporter of Lambda Literary, please consider joining the global leader in promoting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender books, and see your tax-deductible gift doubled.

If you are already a member, please use this opportunity to increase your 2014 contribution so that your tax-deductible gift can be matched dollar-for-dollar.

Like most nonprofit organizations, Lambda Literary counts on your support to sustain our programs, which put the literature of our community front and center and engage our community in dynamic conversations about the state of queer publishing. Your support also allows us to pay our reviewers-so that we can keep readers, librarians and booksellers current on the latest LGBTQ book releases-and host book clubs, readings and workshops. Your support is essential to helping us sustain these unique services. Whether you can afford $50, $250 or $1,000, you will see your contribution doubled through the end of November.

We are grateful to Steven Coulter, Charles Forester, Sandra Nathan, Katherine Percy, John Rochester and Curtis Scribner for their generosity in underwriting our Fall Challenge Grant and Membership Drive. Please help us turn their $17,500 challenge into $35,000 for Lambda Literary’s programs by making a tax-deductible donation today.

 

Categories: Book News, LGBTQ

IFAction News Roundup, October 19 – October 25, 2014

The Office for Intellectual Freedom sponsors IFAction, an email list for those who would like updated information on news affecting intellectual freedom, censorship, privacy, access to information, and more. Click here to subscribe to this list. For an archive of all list postings since 1996, visit the IF Action archive. Below is a sample of articles from September 19  – September 25, 2014.

Filtering, Censorship, Whistle blowing, Free Press, and Free Speech Articles  

ACLU, Liberals Express Concern Over Houston’s Subpoenas of Sermons

Houston Hustle – Claim: The city of Houston, Texas, subpoenaed several pastors’ sermons as part of a crackdown on preaching against homosexuality.

For Art’s Sake! Prisoner Sues over Book Ban [CT]

Copyright Law Stifling Free Speech And Artistic Criticism

FCC Warns Political Campaigns and Promoters Against Robocall Abuse

 

Access, the Digital Divide, Net Neutrality, and Intellectual Property Protection Articles

Three House Dems, three proposals for net neutrality. Here’s what they look like.

The right wasn’t always opposed to regulations protecting online innovation

With no internet at home, kids crowd libraries for online homework

Four ways to advocate for school libraries

Letter: Make Park Ridge library users pay for the use of the library [IL]

 

Privacy, Surveillance, Hacking, and Cybersecurity Articles    

FEMA administrator warns of cellphone vulnerabilities during disasters

Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board on Defining Privacy

[Omaha] Mayor’s Office proposes letting police check out library patron information

The internet of things is here, but the rules to run it are not

Youth Internet Safety: Risks, Responses, and Research Recommendations

Categories: Book News

‘That Door is a Mischief’ by Alex Jeffers

Lambda Literary - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 5:00pm

Liam Shea is not an ordinary teenage boy, growing up in rural Massachusetts; and not just because he has two fathers. Liam is not even a boy; he’s a fairy—literally. A fairy with glowing golden eyes, antennae, dragonfly wings sprouting between his shoulder blades, super-human strength, the power of suggestion, and a serious aversion to cold iron. That Door is a Mischief  by Alex Jeffers tells Liam’s story growing up and living in the world of humans; but because of Liam’s non-human status, this is not your typical coming-of-age story, for the adolescence of a fairy is no less tumultuous than a human’s, if somewhat more spectacular. 

The first five chapters were previously published as short stories, and deal with Liam’s life from age 15 to about 18 or so. Many of the crises Liam has to overcome will be familiar to human adolescents, but each one is minimized—or intensified—because of his fairy status. For example, “The Wild Fairy” shows Liam dealing with high school bullies, which he does by avoiding them as much as possible; their antics do not even cause him much concern, because he knows that he is physically stronger than they are, and could easily overpower them, if he chose to do so. In “The Ordinary Boy” Liam tries to initiate friendship with a human boy (one that not-so-secretly has a crush on him), even “coming out” as a fairy to him. In “The Changelings” Liam crosses over the threshold of puberty, which threatens his life (and the lives of others nearby) and he is only saved by the timely intervention of two humans who previously had been sex slaves in Fairyland. And Liam finally falls in love—with Harry, the chief bully of his youth, in “The Coward.”

For all that the first five chapters deal with Liam’s ostensible “adolescence” among humans, I should stress that this is not a YA book by any stretch of the imagination. The tone of the first five chapters is not that of a typical YA book, with its frank depiction of sexuality and especially with Liam’s amoral, non-human perspective. The final three chapters continue exploring these themes, as Liam and Harry have a non-traditional relationship and explode the idea of what constitutes a family, and (because of Liam’s near immortal lifespan) end in the far, far, future. It is almost cliché for fairy (or half-fairy) boys to be used metaphorically for gay human teens in YA literature (and Jeffers has Liam play on the double entendre himself) but the fairies of Jeffers’ Fairyland are too mercurial to be pinned down by mere human labels; although Liam does eventually bond with, and even marry, a single love interest, he is too omnisexual to be merely “gay” or even “bisexual.”

If there is an overarching theme, I think it is this: Liam, despite being an amoral, physically powerful being, is as affected by love as any human. And fairy love can be as intense as human love—perhaps more so. In the first chapter, it is not the bullies who command Liam’s attention, or even interest:  instead it is his first meeting with another fairy, one who opens a doorway to Fairyland, and Liam is overwhelmed: the sights, scents, the total absence of iron—and yet he refuses to enter, out of love for his human “father.” It is this same love for his father that causes him to downplay the bullies’ antics, and even to attempt friendship with another human boy. Love for Harry drives Liam to attempt a cross-country trip in an airplane (essentially an iron coffin for a fairy), and even to marry, divorce, and remarry Harry, and eventually, to create a memorial for him in Fairyland.

 

That Door is a Mischief
By Alex Jeffers
Lethe Press
Paperback, 9781590212660, 200 pp.
September 2014

Categories: Book News, LGBTQ

Book Review: 'Nora Webster' by Colm Toibin

NPR Books - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 4:22pm

Alan Cheuse reviews a new novel by Colm Toibin, Nora Webster.

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Categories: Book News

75 Years Of 'Colossal Poets' And Live Literature At NYC's 92nd Street Y

NPR Books - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 4:22pm

Writer Cynthia Ozick attended readings at the Y in the 1950s. "You saw these icons standing in a blaze of brilliant spotlight," she says, "and you felt that you were at the crux of all civilization."

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Categories: Book News

The Man Behind Wonder Woman Was Inspired By Both Suffragists And Centerfolds

NPR Books - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 3:28pm

Wonder Woman's creator, William Moulton Marston, had a secret life: He had a wife and a mistress and fathered children with both of them. Jill Lepore explains in The Secret History of Wonder Woman.

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Categories: Book News

Book News: Happy 100th Birthday, Dylan Thomas

NPR Books - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 11:01am

Born on Oct. 27, 1914, the Welsh poet died at 39. But his writing lives on, in his readers' memory and in the performances marking his birth today. Also: a forecast of books to come.

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Categories: Book News

Watch This: Crime Writer James Ellroy Recommends — What Else? — Noir Films

NPR Books - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 4:36am

The author of L.A. Confidential discusses his favorite flicks, including a 1963 Akira Kurosawa film he says may be the greatest crime movie he's ever seen.

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Categories: Book News

LeVar Burton Reads 'Go The [Expletive] To Sleep'

NPR Books - Sun, 10/26/2014 - 5:09pm

To any over-exhausted parents who suspect they're hallucinating, we assure you: Former Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton gave a reading of the 2011 best-seller this weekend.

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Categories: Book News

After The Blackwater Convictions, A Book On Iraq's Nightmarish Reality

NPR Books - Sun, 10/26/2014 - 5:01pm

Four former Blackwater guards were found guilty last week in connection with a fatal shooting in 2007. Author Brian Castner recommends a book on the toll violence has taken on Iraq.

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Categories: Book News

The Freaky, Fabulous, Feminist 'Secret History' Of Wonder Woman

NPR Books - Sun, 10/26/2014 - 5:18am

Jill Lepore's new book about Wonder Woman reveals the unconventional life of her creator, William Moulton Marston, who invented the lie detector, championed feminism, and lived with two women at once.

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Categories: Book News

The Freaky, Fabulous, Feminist 'Secret History' Of Wonder Woman

NPR Books - Sun, 10/26/2014 - 5:18am

Jill Lepore's new book about Wonder Woman reveals the unconventional life of her creator, William Moulton Marston, who invented the lie detector, championed feminism, and lived with two women at once.

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Categories: Book News

The Serious History Of Hocus Pocus In 'Penguin Book Of Witches'

NPR Books - Sun, 10/26/2014 - 5:17am

In Colonial America, a witch was not a Halloween costume, but a criminal. NPR's Rachel Martin revisits this moment in history with Katherine Howe, editor of the new Penguin Book of Witches.

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Categories: Book News
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